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Buying A Coffee Roaster? Here’s A Few Tips to Know First!

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Not long ago, we talked about roasting coffee and how you do it at home. Of course, roasting your own coffee manually at home can be fun, but on some occasions, you might need a bigger and more precise tool to roast your beans, especially if you are considering diving into a roastery business. In that case, you might need an insight into which roaster is best for you and a few tips before you decide to make a purchase

What’s Your Purpose?

Before making the decision, think again about the reason you need a roaster. Buying the wrong roaster machine could cost you a lot, so being impulsive wouldn’t do you any good. The first step not to be impulsive is knowing your purpose. Ask yourself, “Why do I want to buy a roaster machine?” “Do I really need it?” “What am I going to use it for?”. Of course, asking those questions around with minimal knowledge would be pointless. Lucky you, we got you just the insight you need.

Home-Roasting

This one goes for you who just want to test some roasting profiles or you probably roast to make coffee for yourself, not aiming for business. You’d love an electric home coffee baker, the one with a smaller capacity like Barwell Home Coffee Roaster will do just fine for you.

Starting Up Your Roastery

If you’re considering starting a roastery business or wanting to dive into a deeper coffee experience, the first one you want to look for is a drum roaster with an artisan connection, Hottop models for example. The device works in the roasting curve just as a commercial roaster. You can already get the experience of an artisan profile that helps you a lot in productions, with a relatively lower budget. 

Sampling and Comparing Green Beans

You got a significant amount of green beans, or you want to compare different roasting profiles with the same beans. Well, hot air is definitely the one for you. It gives results on your sample beans in a really short amount of time. For this purpose, a Gene Cafe Roaster would help you a lot.

Development on Roasting Profiles

You want to start experimenting with your beans to develop a certain roasting profile, and you need an adaptable profile for the production roaster. Then a drum roaster will do, but remember to pick the one with a thermocouple that measures bean temperature, ambient temperature, and that they can control heat and ventilation separately like the Hottop models. Such roasters are available with electricity as well as with gas. With the power-driven roasters, you make changes to the heat approximately 15 – 30 seconds earlier than with a gas-powered roaster.

Things to Consider Before Buying a Coffee Roaster

Yes, setting up your purpose isn’t the only thing to consider, there’s more to take notes of before ordering your coffee roaster. And here are the things you’re going to need to keep in mind.

No 1 – Capacity

Picking the right size for your roaster is crucial. And to make the call you gotta find what’s best for your purpose. For a new or considering roaster, we’d recommend you a sample roaster that has the capacity of around 50 – 500 g, or the small-batch roaster at around 1 – 3 kg. If you’re already quite settled to the business, the commercial roaster that’s around 5 kg and even beyond 70 kg is for you.

Picking the right size for your roaster is crucial. And to make the call you gotta find what’s best for your purpose.

No 2 – Precision

The next thing to consider is precision. You gotta think about what level of precision you need. The Hottop models are great if you’d like to have precise control and consistency, but if you’re the type to like a simple good coffee roasting then roasters like Gene models will do you just fine.

No 3 – Features

The features of your roaster are just as crucial. Always check the features of your roaster-to-be then match with your purpose. First of all, is to check whether your roaster has a reliable user interface, make sure you can understand how to use it just by looking. The next thing to consider is what kind of chamber it has, whether it is a classic drum roaster for faster and hotter roasting with less risk of tipping, fluid-bed for more control of temperature and stable taste, or a recirculation roaster that’s the most energy-efficient one, or an indirectly heated drum roaster. Another feature to check on your list especially on the more advanced one is if the roaster has a variable speed drive fan that allows you to maintain a consistent airflow level, air manometer to read the amount of air pressure, proper probes and probe locations to analyze your roasting process better by the software.

Always check the features of your roaster-to-be then match with your purpose.

No 4 – Safety

Roaster could be a quite dangerous device since it produces a high level of heat. Always make sure that the roaster you’re about to purchase is safe enough for your purpose. Check the safety certification and ask about it before you decide to swipe on your card.

No 5 – Budget

At the end of the day, the last thing you need to do is adjust all the considerations on your list with your budget, there’s a price for better things, right? Surely, a commercial and a high capacity or a complete-featured roaster will have to cost you more, that’s why it is important to carefully consider whether you really need all that or not. If you don’t, you can save a little more by choosing a domestic model or a small batch roaster.

Taking Care Of Your Coffee Roaster

Buying a coffee roaster could cost you a lot of cash, relatively. And when you finally got one in your place, you want to keep it working well, as long as possible. You don’t want to see your roaster perform lowly in just a few months, and here are a few notes that could help you prevent that from happening.

Just like taking care of any other machine, it’s only common sense to always clean your device regularly. For your roaster machine, do the cleaning at least every once every week for the main filter, and once a month for the chaff from the roasting chamber. Oh and don’t forget to use a cleaner that cuts through grease to clean out the roasting oils.

Now you got a little more insight about buying a coffee roaster,  so there’s no more reason for you to be impulsive without considering these prominent factors. Take notes of what you read just now and it’ll come in handy when it’s your time to get one.

Do the cleaning at least every once every week for the main filter, and once a month for the chaff from the roasting chamber. Don’t forget to use a cleaner that cuts through grease to clean out the roasting oils.

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